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at the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e-mails and cell phones? >> guest: the short answer is that is confused and the longer answer is for e-mail that is less than 180 days old law enforcement need to warrant -- for e-mail more than 180 years old, it is just a subpoena, so there's no judicial intervention, no high standard of proof. for documents you store in the clouds, if you store something with google docs and come back and edit it, that is available with a subpoena. cell phones, there is no statutory provision about location information. so the courts have been in different places. some say if it is real-time location, for that they need a warrant. others say this gps location for that they need a warrant. there is not a clear rule yet for cell phone. >> host: what are the changes the judicial committee has approved? >> guest: they focus on content of communications. they said it should matter how will the content is. it shouldn't matter whether you stored it with this kind of a communication service provider or that o
? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule of law doctorate -- doctrine. the most important steps ahead for china will be around bolstering the rule of law. the implications are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2,
as a public service by your television providers. >>> next from the georgetown university law certainly in washington, d.c., a discussion on the supreme court. it's about an hour ten minutes. >>> hello, everyone, want i want to welcome you to the program which features an al star lineup of authors who will be doing the most recent book on the supreme court. i'm a professor here at georgetown. and executive directer of the supreme court institute. it's a real privilege for the supreme court institute to host this event, and i'd like to thank our deputy directer dory burn seen to putting it together. before i turn the program over to our moderators, i'd like to remind thearch after the program, we have a reception following in which you'll gate chance to have all your newly purchased books signed by the authors. have a word or two with the authors, hopefully, and as you can see, we have food and beverage, so please stick around after the program. with that, i would like to introduce our moderators. today for today's program tony morrow. tony needs no introduction at all. i'll keep it shor
, for senator tom coburn at noon eastern on booktv's in depth on c-span2. >> now a forum on the rule of law in sino, a panel that includes u.s. ambassador to china and jon huntsman. we will show as much as we can until our live event at 8:30 eastern. [applause] >> thank you for that very kind introduction. i have a great honor of being a distinguished fellow here at brookings but i can tell with justice brier and with these distinguished legal experts appear there's nothing distinguished about me at all. today i come pretty much as a regular fellow as opposed to any kind of distinguished fellow. what we have ahead is a great presentation by some people you will find interesting, about development of the rule of law in china. i wanted to offer a few introductory comments on the china relationship in general. may i first thank john thornton for your vision and support for the center and parking than the leadership you provide. and an extraordinary scholar, and every utterance and every monogram you put out is red and scrutinized by everybody. i just know somebody on the chinese side who write
closed doors on these changes to the law before they were introduced in statehouses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and perfidious and passionate poetry from philip appleman. >> money buys prophets and teachers, poems and art. so, listen, if you're so rich, why aren't you smart? >> funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. carthufoundati, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischm
the law and didn't do their job for the american people and it's the president that hasn't led this country and come up with a plan for the american people. jay carney might say hey, listen, we've got a plan and this is the plan. well then share the plan with the american people. then we can get somewhere in this country and we can actually tackle the spending and debt that's going to bankrupt us all. >> reince, if the plan is exactly as he has stated here, and it includes some tax increases as the vast majority, nearly two thirds, more than two thirds of the american public want, actually want, if that is on the table, why wouldn't the republicans sign up to it? >> listen, i don't know the details of what he's offering, piers. i'm not trying to hide behind any of it. i just can't actually have an intelligent conversation about a plan hypothetically that we haven't seen, that might include tax increases and might not and might include some deduction loophole eliminations that we haven't seen. how can you have an intelligent conversation like this? you actually have to see a pla
, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text written brian a. garner -- >> as the earlier book was. >> rose: exactly. so what did you hope to accompl
donkey, or lack thereof. i love the picture. it reminded me of a priceless letter he sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
chris 26 years ago at hastings law school, two blocks from here. we were in the same section in the same study group. when we finished law school we both went to the east coast to work for large law firms. over the years we stayed in close touch. when chris was back from over seas we were frequent tennis partners and would get together for dinners and other events in washington. over the years our families became friends as well. it's been such a pleasure to come to know them and chris's many friends in washington and to watch his career unfold. we met on the first day of school. i sat down in our civil procedure class next to a person who turned out to be named chris highland. shortly thereafter chris stevens sat down next to me. the three of us went to lunch afterwards and became friends from that day forward. chris never tried to be someone special but he was someone special. when we were at hastings his charm and wit were on display from the start. in class he was very articulate and seemed as later in life always very poised and well spoken and at ease. i think our professors loved
massachusetts and i differ on most of these treaties, with the same disagreement on the law of the sea treaty. the question is in my opinion is their sovereignty of believe infringed upon our sovereignty and with that i yield the floor. >> mr. president, i yield five minutes. to the senator from illinois. >> by methinks senator kerry, senator mccain, senator lugar and so many others who have put this matter to the floor. it was 22 years ago when a historic event took place on the fourth united states senate which changed the united states of america. 20 years ago we passed the americans with disabilities act and reset a disability should not disqualify you for them at you in terms of their opportunity as an american. for some people said this is obvious. everyone knows. it was also obvious was discrimination taking place all across this great land. we remove that barrier to discrimination and in passing the americans with disabilities act can we step forward at the nation. with their fear and concern? i can recall going to greene county in rural illinois and marketing to carrollton and the ci
. smith: mr. speaker, h.r. 6620, the former presidents protection act of 2012, amends federal law to uniformerly provide lifetime secret service protection to all of america's former presidents. i want to thank the gentleman from south carolina, mr. gowdy, and the gentleman from virginia, mr. scott, for sponsoring this commonsense bipartisan legislation. america has a responsibility to protect its presidents and its families and not simply while they serve in office. we also have a duty to ensure the ongoing safety of those who serve in america's highest elected office after they leave office. in 1958 congress first authorized secret service protection for former presidents, which was limited to a reasonable period of time after a president leaves office. congress expanded this to lifetime protection in 1965. but in 1994, congress once again limited secret service protection for former presidents. this time to 10 years after a president leaves office. this 10-year restriction applied to presidents who took office after january 1, 1997. the role of the former president has changed
had never met him. it was all under a little-known law that's designed to keep native american children in native american homes, but is it the right thing to do? we will update you, next. i hav, and i took nyquil, but i'm still "stubbed" up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have a decongestant. no way. [ male announcer ] sorry. alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms plus has a fast acting decongestant to relieve your stuffy nose. [ sighs ] thanks! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] to learn more about the cold truth and save $1 visit alka-seltzer on facebook. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> a train derailment in new jersey causes a highly toxic chemical leak into a river. so what caused this disaster? that's ahead. tions, but obligat. tions, but
from the only parents she ever knew and returned to her biological father under a little known law designed to keep native american children in native american homes. we'll update you on baby veronica's story next. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. and could save you in out-of-pocket medical costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand medicare and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you. with this type of plan, you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare patients... plus, there are no networks, and you'll never need a referral to see a specialist. there's a range of plans to choose from, too. and they all travel with you. anywhere in the country. join the millions wh
the only parents she ever knew and returned to her biological father under a little known law designed to keep native american children in native american homes. we'll update you on baby veronica's story next. >>> a train derailment in new jersey causes a highly toxic chemical leak into a river. so what caused this disaster? that's ahead.d# 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) to a schwab ira, and we'll help you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 find new ways to make your money work harder. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so if you're ready to teach your old 401(k) some new tricks... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 talk to chuck. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 rollover your old 401(k) tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to a schwab ira tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can receive up to $600. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 see schwab.com tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 for terms and conditions. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call, click or visit tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to open an account today. good boy. there's the sign to the bullpen. here he comes. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job, the pitch! whoa! so why are you doing his?
present member dhaka by law. it's a great pleasure to be reviewed. i feel so happy. thank you for your hospitality. this is my first visit as the president-elect of mexico, and i also want to congratulate you for your victory last november 6th for your second term as president to the united states and we wish you great success. i know you have a great task before you but i trust that you will be doing a wonderful job and i also want to thank you, president obama for having the vice president joe biden were go to mexico for the inaugural ceremony next saturday december 1st. i feel so pleased to be able to have the vice president biden represent you in mexico, and of course we are waiting for you in the delegation. >> [speaking in native tongue] the >> this is an opportunity we only have every 12 years. you will be starting your next four year term. i will be starting a six year administration in mexico as you know and i think this is a great opportunity for all of us to have a closer link of brotherhood and sisterhood and collaboration and of course of great accomplishments we might hav
to a referendum before the end the year. the draft constitution gives islamic sharia law a bigger role and empowers the state to protect morals and values but there are few details on what that means. and a clause that specifically guarantees equality for women were removed. this is a blogger who believes the draft constitution could be used to violate her rights. >> you have no right to tell me,000 live my life. 000 dress, how to cook. this is what they did in the constitution. >> reporter: on tahrir square egyptians from many walks of life agree with her. this is an ultraconservative muslim. he told us that if egyptians want democracy the constitution should represent all segments of society not just the islamists. egypt's revolution of two years ago was supposed to mark the birth of a new democracy, but some here now fear that one group of egyptians is trying to impose their own views on everyone else. >> i wonder to what degree -- >> president morsi is making a political gamble. he's betting the majority of egyptians will vote for this constitution and if he
, the health care law may face in the coming days and in the coming years with julie rovner of n.p.r., and we'll be right back. >> program under began under tugwell who was one of the advisers to president franklin roosevelt. to document the conditions under which people were living, this was back when we didn't have television. we had radio, but a lot of places didn't have electricity so they couldn't listen to the radio broadcast to find out what was going on in parts of the country. royce striker, who was an economist from columbia university, he was the head of this project, and in 1939 when kodak introduced color film, they sent film to roy striker to have his photographers try out, to see what they could do. kodak was trying to establish a new market, a new product and they wanted people who would know how to use it effectively to try it out and publicize it. >> america of the 1930's and 40's comes to life through the eye of the camera as they share some of the 1,600 color photographs taken during the depression and world war ii. sundays at 7:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. eastern. part of amer
things that could rap right now is the house could vote and the president would sign into law legislation that would provide certainty for middle-class families. 98% of american families, and some 97% of small businesses. so it's time for the house to act. secondly, i think we have to take steps to make sure that we're creating jobs at a faster pace, as i mentioned before. i'm introducing legislation today to help middle-class families and -- middle noik families and to boost hiring. it would expand the payroll tax cut from last year for one year and give employers a tax credit for hiring. and i'll be talking about that legislation. now, the payroll cut that we -- tax cut that we put into place last year had a number of benefits. i won't go through all of those today but the joint economic committee, the committee of which i'm the chairman, just put out a report in the last 24 hours, it's a fact sheet that highlights some of the benefits of the payroll tax cut. mr. president, just for the record i would ask consent that the joint economic committee fact sheet on the payroll tax cut dated
is working to change the law. the law that lets cops and the feds read our e-mails. they can just read them if the messages are more than six months old. a change coming that could affect all privacy. i am still on air today because my staff didn't win the record $588 million powerball jackpot. the deal was, if they won, obviously they were thought coming to work and the stage manager was going to anchor and i was going to hang out on their boat. but, no, there are two winners, obviously we hate them. we will talk about them unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." >> first from fox at 3:00, the united nations general assembly hold a historic vote any moment on recognizing an independent palestinian state. it is expected to pass overwhelmingly despite opposition from the united states and israel which are in a vast majority of the u.n.'s 193 members. this measure would "reaffirm the right of the palestinian people to self determination and to independence in their state of palestine, on the palestinian territory, occupied since 1967." here is a look at how the land was d
on the bill they just debated, changing federal energy efficiency laws. we'll take you live next to the capital, the chair and co-chair of the democratic caucus, just starting a briefing talking about the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of hav
bazell, nbc news, new york. >>> up next here tonight, the actual research about getting along with the in-laws. >>> veteran new yorkers didn't know what they were looking at last night. a lot of them were worried someone had gone and tarted up the dignified empire state building. it was the first display of a new array of lights at the very top of what is still the grand master of the new york skyline. last night's show was coordinated to an alicia keys song. the owners of the building say they'll use the new led lights to display various light patterns from now on. we'll be watching. >>> one of the most influential figures in american sports has died. marvin miller never played major league baseball, but he changed the game nonetheless. when he took the job as leader of the major league players union in 66, the minimum salary back then was $6,000, and the owners had all the power. by 1982, when he retired, the union was one of the strongest in the u.s. the average player's salary was almost a quarter million dollars. the players had won free agency. he was by any standard a game changer. marv
law, in their words, to interfere with domestic laws in the united states, whether federal law, state, or local laws. and one of the most recent major reasons why they rejected this treaty, these republicans by in large voted again ratifying this treaty was because of the powerful words that rick santorum, the former republican presidential candidate said. as you know, he has a severely disabled child, a little girl. he said, i don't want international lawyers, i don't want the united nations and new york and foreign countries telling me and our local officials what they can or cannot do as far as treatment for little bella, his daughter. and that was a powerful factor in convincing a lot of these republicans to reject this treaty. they didn't see that they needed the international community, in effect, to get involved in what was going on here in the united states. the counterargument, of course, is we want to bring, by ratifying this treaty, to bring the rest of the world up to the u.s. standards in hoping those with disabilities but that obviously didn't resonate, at least not enou
laws and we believe that we can prove in a court of law that the founding fathers who were so smart they put six instances in the constitution for a supermajority vote. you can't impeach the president. you can't have a trade bill. you can't amend the constitution. without a supermajority. but if you read the federalist papers and english commonlaw, it is clear that they were fearful that on every issue you needed a supermajority. in 1965, medicare passed. most people like medicare. had 55 votes. if it came before the senate before, it would fail. >> eliot: i gotta -- >> one very quick thing the healthcare legislation was watered down time and again by the use of the filibuster and they kept making it weaker and weaker and weaker because they needed 60 votes to even consider it. >> eliot: not that it matters but if i were a judge, i would say the fact of the constitution specifies where you do need a supermajority implicitly says you don't therefore fill buster is not constitutional. i did not know that about aar
of these cases is a challenge to a federal law called the defense of marriage act passed by congress in 1996, signed by president clinton. and it says if a couple a legally married under state law, one of the nine states that now or soon will grant the right for same-sex couples to get married, those marriages are not recognized under federal law and as a practical matter, that deprives those couples of about 1,000 federal benefits. that law has been challenged by lawsuits in several states. if seems pretty likely the court will take that case because it'sen validating an act of congress. so it seems pretty likely that the court will take that or we could find that out this afternoon. now, the other big thing we're watching is the challenge to california's proposition 8, the voter approved measure that was passed in 2008 that ended gay marriage in california. two lower courts have said it's unconstitutional and we're waiting to see if the supreme court will take that case, as well. we should know as you say any minute. >> let's go back to the defense of marriage act here because this is espe
the president has gotten tougher than he was in the first term and he lays down the law again today. >> the thinking is that the republicans will have more leverage because there will be another debt ceiling and we'll extract with stronger leverage on the debt ceiling. i just have to tell you that is--that is a bad strategy for america. it's a bad strategy for your businesses. and it is not a game that i will play. >> cenk: damn! he's not going to play that game. i hope he means it. so we'll see how that turns out of course. now let's have some fun. let's bring in jude freeman. a conservative in los angeles. what happened, due get lost. >> and jewish, yes very lost. >> cenk: let's talk about boehner and the grand bargain. are you with the heritage who says it's too soft or does it make sense. >> grover norquist said we should film it all. republicans, democrats and just call it survival washington, and watch this for 24 hours as long as it takes them to work something out. >> cenk: yes, it's not going to happen, and i'll tell you why the guys who will block it are the republicans. i
of employees he has to less than 50 so he won't be subject to penalties under the 2010 health law. so right now the federal government is keeping him from offering jobs. that hurts the people who need jobs and who would be happy to be on a payroll where they would be putting their own contributions into social security and medicare. increasing taxes means less growth and fewer jobs, and that's not balanced. three years ago i made a pledge to oppose tax increases. i made that pledge to the citizens i serve and to no one else, and i made it because tax increases will hurt them. when jen, the owner of la petite cuisine in new york says the best thing i can do is give her a break from high taxes, i believe her. i ran for congress to help jen and all the small business people like her who are the engines of job creation. i ran for congress to help all the people who need employers like jen to hire them. these good people deserve better than temporary fixes. they deserve a plan that solves our economic problems for the long term. they deserve a plan that goes beyond politics and shows a commitment to
father-in-law is in chinatown sro, too. my father-in-law's building had this bed bug infestation. when he goes to bed, all the bed bugs come out at night. so he got bitten pretty badly all over the neck, the head. he reported to the manager. the manager just did a real routine thing about the bed bugs. so my father-in-law went to chinatown cdc for help. so that was brought to the attention of the health department. so he couldn't even sleep well at night. so we are really hopeful that the legislation will help people to understand how they are treated and get better. we are living in a pretty bad situation once you have bed bugs. so we hope that we could get this legislation done really fast, so things will get better for us. we thank the supervisors to put such an emphasis on improving the environment for us. thank you. >> thank you. i'm going to call up a couple more name cards. [ reading speakers' names ] >> good afternoon supervisors, thank you, my name is jorge potio, a lifetime resident of san francisco and i want to start by recognizing the hard work that has been put into the
gupta, a law and mba student at george washington university, died suddenly. mysteriously. he's no relationship to me, but when his family got word, they spent hours trading phone calls. they were in stunned disbelief. >> there was a message from his mom, and she had left three messages for me so i knew there was something wrong. >> i received a call from my mom. i didn't answer, but then i got a text message from her, which is very unusual. >> and i called her back. and i said, what happened? and she says, it's ben. he died. i just -- i didn't have any of the information. >> i finally said, how did this happen? and she said he went to sleep the night before and he just never woke up. >> he's always smiling, every picture he's smiling. >> for days, ben gupta's family was desperate for answers. what killed him? he was only 28 years old. he had recently been given a clean bill of health. how could he just not wake up? >> and then the thought went through my mind that maybe it was some sort of a brain aneurism or something must have happened. >> but his father was in for a shock
in the the health care law might mauck you down right sick right now. the white house just announcing plans to slap health insurers with a fee if they sell insurance dictated by the president's health care law and larry says you'll pay for it no matter where you live, huh? >> that's right. that's right, you know, administrative costs and health care are already skyrocketing and this is going it to get past the consumer just like everybody else. we already see skyrocketing health care costs, 14% is administrated, it's just too much. >> some parts of the law lower prices and is it net neutral, basically? >> i think the only given is that the country as a whole is goingo spend mor on health care andore people are going to have insurance one way or another, gun point are fine or whatever it is, but the actual premiums among are necessarily going to change. although there are plenty of things to raise your premium, not allowing the insurance company to reject, is going to raise premiums and some premiums are paid for like a tax next year, on capital gains for wealthy people, it's not health care payment
the law. they changed the law so that only a special election could fill a vacant seat. until then, the seat would have to be empty. mitt romney tried to veto that new law. but the legislature overrode his veto, thereby stripping mitt romney of his power to choose a replacement. that became a mute point because john kerry didn't win so he stayed on as senator. but then fast forward fife years. 2009. new president barack obama, the country embroiled in a big debate over national health reform. those against it were against it to the point of rage. and those wo who wanted it were excited to be on the cusp of achieving something they had failed to achieve for decades. at the time the democrat hs a majority in the united states senate, 60 seats is a filibuster super majority. that's enough to pass health reform. that majority for the democrats included senator ted kennedy. senator kennedy spent his career trying to pass health reform. it was his life's work. he had done it at the state level with that guy, mitt romney. he had led on the issue nationally for decades. it was his signatur
borrowed and spent all the program surplus revenues from years past, which by law congress now has to pay back. adding to the deficit. >> the money came in. congress spent it. look here, we have money to spend. let's go ahead and spend it up. there it went. it's gone. >> social security now needs to start getting the money back again adds to the deficit. just this year alone, the social security trustees' report that "in 2012, the projected difference between social security's dedicated tax income and expenditures is $165 billion." part of the $165 billion added to the deficit, $112 billion of it is a result of the payroll tax cut that president obama pushed through, which by law congress also had to restore to the trust fund. all points republicans emphasize in the current talks. >> why in the world would they want to talk about the fact that vital program started spending out more than it took in, in 2010, for the first time in 30 years? >> shortal in social security eventually reaches hundreds of billions a year. but some changes now would help reducing the benefits for the wealthy or
, sean, the real fiscal cliff is when the laws of economics kick in, which they will inevitably do, they have to do, because it can't go on like this. you see the results of hitting the wall in greece, in spain, i3 italy. it will happen here. unlike the european countries, there's nobody to bail us out. >> sean: how much debt could we realistically take on before the bond markets abandon us? >> we're already there. >> sean: so the very people, they voted for barack obama, they voted for more of the same, didn't listen to the arguments we were making, it was a close election, but not close enough, so they're going to be -- the people that he appealed to with class warfare, aren't they the ones most likely to get hurt? >> listen, absolutely. and warren buffett came out today and said,ing hey, he thinks it will a boost for the morale of the middle class. with all due respect to warren buffett, a boost to the middle-class is raising tax rates on the rich? >> sean: why don't they give it to the government if they think it's a moral imperative? >> i don't know what he's trying to drive i
for which the law enforcement and intelligent resources of our government are principally responsible. >> at some point, it will stop being war and go back to plg police work against terrorism as a threat that we fight, but we do not say we are at war with it anymore. how much would it change us back as a country to hit that point? can we go back? have we irreversibly changed ourselves for being at war for 2 years now? is this first word on how we might do it reasonably expect we are going to get there? >> war violates the natch really order of things in which children bury their parents. in war, parents bury their children. we must not accept the conflict as the "new normal." >> joining us is john suskind. thank you for being here. >> my pleasure. >> is there a window of political opportunity right now in washington after this election to change the footing we decided on after 9/11? some of the stuff the president carried over? >> indisputably. that's what people are hopeful about. is this going to be a predicate? an opportunity for the president now that he doesn't have to stand for
asked today is it the case of the law that you have to release a 9/1 9/11 dash 911 tape like this or do they keep them private? >> andrea: if a request is made, subpoena to the tape and get reporting they are allowed to because it's part of the public record. once you do the proper steps you can get it. certain case, judge or prosecutor is pending, which we don't have here, because everybody is deceased that was involved in it. they can block it and say it's in the best interest to keep this sealed or out of the public domain. you can imagine a situation like to is very traumatic. this little girl is going to grow up knowing that her father murdered her mother. this tape is out there. it will be on the web. >> dana: any other thoughts about this before we move on? >> greg: it will change the behavior. if you know it will be released, that is the problem. it may prevent people from calling. i never like having them released. if you at a party and someone is in trouble maybe you won't call because you don't want to be involved. >> bob: good point. good point. >> dana: all right. let's mov
that the seattle law is consistent with the first amendment. and, colleagues, i also want to mention that i'm still committed to finding policies that reduce yellow page blight and i'm working with the city attorney to hopefully draft new legislation to find alternate approaches to achieving the same goal. at this time, colleague, i hope you will be able to support this legislation in light of the 9th circuit. >> thank you. thank you, president chiu. supervisor wiener. >> i thank you and i want to thank president chiu for having pursued this legislation which i was happy to support and i was really saddened by the ninth slur circuit ruling. it seems that our federal courts more and more are fetishizing commercial and corporate speech. i fundamentally disagree with that. with that said, the current law is what it is and i will be reluctantly supporting this suspension and hope to revive legislation in the not too distant future. >> thank you. let's open this up for public comment. is there anyone from the public that would like to speak? seeing none, public comment is closed. so, r colleagues, there
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